S. Amir Kohan

Favoring Feelings over Facts and Truths in Human Resources Affairs and Decision Making

In today’s fast-paced and competitive world, the pressure to perform and succeed can often lead individuals to prioritize their own comfort and well-being over the objective facts and truths that underpin successful decision-making. This tendency can be particularly dangerous in the context of management and human resources affairs, where decisions can have significant and long-lasting impacts on individuals and organizations alike.
One of the most significant dangers of giving preference to feeling good over facts or truths is that it can lead to a lack of accountability and transparency in decision-making. When individuals prioritize their own comfort over objective facts and data, they may be more likely to make decisions that are self-serving and do not align with the best interests of the organization or its employees. This can create a culture of mistrust and resentment, where employees feel that their concerns and needs are not being taken seriously, and where management is seen as more concerned with their own well-being than that of their employees.

Another danger of prioritizing feeling good over facts or truths is that it can lead to a lack of innovation and progress. When individuals are more concerned with maintaining the status quo and avoiding discomfort or conflict, they may be less likely to take risks, challenge assumptions, or pursue new ideas. This can stifle creativity and innovation within an organization, leading to a decline in competitiveness and relevance over time.

In the context of human resources affairs, giving preference to feeling good over facts or truths can have particularly negative consequences. For example, if a manager is more concerned with maintaining a positive working environment than with addressing issues of harassment or discrimination, they may be less likely to take appropriate action to address these problems. This can create a hostile work environment for affected employees, leading to low morale, high turnover, and potential legal liability for the organization.

Overall, while it is important to prioritize the well-being and comfort of employees, it is equally important to base decisions on objective facts and data. By doing so, managers and human resources professionals can ensure that their decisions are in the best interests of the organization and its employees, rather than just serving their own personal preferences or biases. This will lead to a more transparent, accountable, and innovative workplace, where employees feel valued and respected, and where the organization is better positioned to succeed in a rapidly changing world.


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